What to Consider Before Marrying Someone From a Foreign Country

Updated on November 22, 2016

When you are in love, it tends to override many practicalities. It is becoming more and more common for interracial couples to get married. Far from being a problem, I think this is a wonderful thing! I think that any couple in love, gay or straight, young or old, of different or the same race should be able to get married and live happily ever after.

However, there are some unfortunate practicalities which come with marrying a person of a different race and culture, especially one who resides in a different country. I met and fell in love with my husband in the Czech Republic. He is American and I am English, so fortunately we share a common language, but we've been through a lot of difficulties to be together and face many more to come. These are some of the life-changing things you'll need to talk about before taking the plunge.

1: Where Will You Live?

You may think that anywhere is fine so long as you can be together, but real life throws a lot of spanners and other bits and bobs in the works. Will you live in your native country, or your fiance's? Of course, if you are both based in the same place this won't necessarily apply. If you are from separate countries, though, here are a few things you'll need to discuss before making the decision:

  • Can you speak the necessary language? If you plan to move abroad, you should consider the potential isolation of not speaking the language. It will mean total dependence on your spouse, which can upset the balance of a relationship.
  • Can you or your spouse work abroad? Wherever you decide to live, make sure you have realistic job prospects. It took me six months to be eligible to work in America. Having financial dependence on your spouse as well as nothing to occupy your time can really put a strain on a new marriage.
  • Can you obtain a visa? Visas are expensive, complicated and an overall headache. Think about how you will go about this before anything else - what steps you will need to take, how much it will cost, and how long it will be until you can live in the same country.
  • What about family and friends? Marriage is permanent, and one of you will be permanently removed from your family and friends whatever happens. Don't take this lightly. It's a huge step and you'll need to talk about it together before making any solid plans.

Visas are a Pain in the A**!
Visas are a Pain in the A**!

What Will Your Wedding Be Like?

It may seem like a small one, but for a Catholic marrying a Muslim or even an American marrying an Englishwoman, it can be a big deal. Will you get married in a church? A religious ceremony? At home or abroad? On learning how many different traditions were attached to an American wedding, I was surprised. Luckily my husband and I both wanted a quiet, non-religious ceremony so no troubles were had. For others, here are some considerations:

  • Will your family approve: Uniting families of different cultural backgrounds can be a challenge. It shouldn't stop you, but it creates some complications. Even our respective American and English families had some troubles not reverting to stereotypes on meeting each other. You needn't try to please everyone, but you at least need to please yourselves. If you're having trouble now, be aware that the issue will continue to affect you in the future.
  • Where will you get married? The one regret I have about my wedding is that it happened in America. Marrying someone from a different country can mean making sacrifices, and this is just the first stepping stone. Be aware that if this small thing is an area of dispute, there will be troubled waters to come.
  • Which traditions will you embrace? Picking one cultural tradition over another or intermingling the two can be a challenge. We shirked all tradition and just went with what felt natural, but it can be a big deal if you have a strong ethnic identity. Make sure you talk it over and both find a solution you can be happy with. Making sacrifices at this stage means you will be making more down the road, so watch out!

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3: How Will You Raise Your Children?

I know, it's the last thing on most people's minds as newlyweds, but eventually you'll need to think about it, and it's best to know if you share opinions. Here are a few of the things you need to agree on:

  • Education: Where will they be educated? When my husband and I have children, I'd like them to go to school in England even though they will probably be born in America. Luckily it's something my husband will consider. Make sure you're on the same page, or at least the same chapter, on this issue. It will be a huge factor later.
  • Religion: Luckily neither my husband nor I have strong religious views, but for many interracial couples this is a huge issue. Raising your children in a certain religion is a big decision - if you are a religious person living in a country with a different primary religion, consider how much it will affect you and your family long-term. Make sure it's not something which will divide your opinions.
  • Family: Again, having children away from your family is a big consideration if you have family in separate countries. Will you be OK with that? It's a point worth discussing and one which my husband and I still haven't come to a conclusion about.

England and America: A Long Way to Move
England and America: A Long Way to Move | Source

Learning to Compromise

Of course, all marriage is about compromise. Essentially, both of you need to agree to disagree on some matters, but marriage is not about giving up on the things you love and value. For a successful marriage between two people from different countries, the most important factors are that you:

  • Have similar values: You should have similar goals in life, ideas about the roles of men and women, about right and wrong, honesty and ethics. Similar values generally mean that you want and expect the same things, which will mean fewer problems and disagreements. Of course you can't agree on everything, but make sure your fundamental values will mesh.
  • Love and respect each other: This is the key to any successful marriage. Even if you have different cultures and traditions, respect the other person's values. I make sure to pipe down on the Fourth of July, and my husband dutifully eats his pancakes on Shrove Tuesday. Marrying someone from another country should never mean that either one of you loses your own culture.
  • See each other's point of view: Even if you have different ideas of how things should be, you need to listen and understand the other person's perspective. During my first Christmas in America my husband couldn't understand why I insisted on making Christmas Pudding even though he hates dried fruit. Now he recognises that integrating both our traditions is important, even if it is over something small.
  • Make sure you compensate for living abroad: For us, my living in America means frequent and expensive trips to England are a must. It's not ideal, but we knew before we got married that it was inevitable and non-negotiable. Make sure you have a plan you agree on so that you are both happy. It's not about winning or losing the fight to have your own way - it's about finding a way that works for both of you.

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    • profile image

      ™DARK ANGEL™•• 

      33 hours ago

      That's very amazing I think

    • profile image

      intlwives 

      2 years ago

      Loving this advice! Ladies, if you are married to or dating a man of another culture/country come and join us: https://www.facebook.com/internationalwivesofafric...

      We are supportive and help each other and soon to come will be our reality series "A Day In The Life of An International Wife".

    • mathira profile image

      mathira 

      4 years ago from chennai

      emily, your hub was right on target when you considered all the pros and cons of marrying a person who is from a different country.

    • cfin profile image

      cfin 

      4 years ago from The World we live in

      Also, make sure you like it here first, specifically where you are going to live. We both wish we had stayed where I grew up and once we moved here it became impossible to relocate again. It's easy the first time, but things get complicated after a few years. It's ok where I live now, but we are only here for a specific job at this point.

      All in all, it will work out :)

    • emilynemchick profile imageAUTHOR

      Emily Nemchick 

      4 years ago from Phoenix, AZ

      Hi Stu,

      I actually did the same as cfin, who is completely correct in saying it's not strictly the 'right' way since you're only allowed to marry on a tourist visa if you have no intention of marrying before entering the US (my husband and I didn't plan to get married. I went to visit and we ended up getting married). However, it's a hard thing to prove either way, so as long as you are subtle about your intentions, you could 'visit' and get married and probably be OK. We actually got married on the strength of a lawyer's advice, so you can make of that what you will.

      The downside is that the change of status still takes quite some time, so I was waiting on a work permit for about 5 0r 6 months. There isn't really an easy option - I think this is the easiest one.

      I believe the current waiting time on a fiancée visa is 5 months but it can take much longer and you'll be apart whilst it's getting sorted out. As far as I remember, you then have 3 months in which you can be in America and get married. This is the most usual thing to do as far as I know.

      It takes a lot of time, but I'm so glad we made our way through it. Best of luck whatever you decide on!

    • cfin profile image

      cfin 

      4 years ago from The World we live in

      Hi Stu,

      It is "not correct" to do as I did, but here it is. Entered on a tourist visa, got married, changed status.

      A fiancée visa would result in significant time apart (think 6 - 18 months) while your fiancée petitions for you to enter the country. These fiancé visas were created for people who require a visa to enter. Unfortunately, they also encompass us even though we do not require a visa to enter. But don't waste your time fighting the system or stating how obviously stupid it is. Instead it's best to just do as they as (finger prints scans 3 times just in case...you know...your finger prints morph).

      Yet here I am having changed my status(to a green card holder with conditions) after entering on a VWP. Don't bother with a lawyer if you are competent with paperwork.

      USCIS are extremely biased and being English (or Irish as I am) they have no issues. Sad but true.

      Plan to not work for 6 months - 9 months after arrival. Get your forms in order. Use immihelp.com http://www.immihelp.com/greencard/familybasedimmig...

      FYI, I have a legal background.

    • profile image

      Stu 

      4 years ago

      Hi Emily,

      Great article and interesting read. I am from London, UK and have a partner out in Arizona. We are still working out the best possible way forward for us! We have agreed that I would move to America, but it seems difficult! But reading your article has given me hope :).

      I have a question which hopefully you can answer, you got married in America - did you get a Fiancé visa for this or was this not needed? Marriage looks like the only way for me to move to America permanently, which is a shame as we would like to live together for an appropriate amount of time before we 'tie the knot'.

      Hopefully that makes sense, but what can I say - we have met twice and madly in love. We know what we want the future to be, we just need to make it happen!

      Stu

    • emilynemchick profile imageAUTHOR

      Emily Nemchick 

      5 years ago from Phoenix, AZ

      I am lucky that my American mother-in-law and sister-in-law are both awesome and very kind to me. I think my husband and I would both like to move to England or at least Europe sometime but it's not possible right now. Hang in there, there's plenty to love about America too (although maybe not compared to Ireland).

    • cfin profile image

      cfin 

      5 years ago from The World we live in

      I'm Irish married to an American. The only thing I find overwhelming about the married side of things are how over baring in-laws are in the USA :O

      We went to Ireland for awhile, as our country of choice and had a terrible run of luck. My wife was more disappointed than I was when I accepted a job in the US again :/

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