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Interracial Marriages Don't Work: True or False?

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I am a happily married Christian who loves communicating with others and the words which make that happen.

In 1967, Richard P. Loving and his wife, Mildred, won a U.S. Supreme Court decision that overturned laws prohibiting interracial unions.

In 1967, Richard P. Loving and his wife, Mildred, won a U.S. Supreme Court decision that overturned laws prohibiting interracial unions.

The Breakthrough of Interracial Marriage

Richard P. Loving and his wife, Mildred, were convicted under Virginia law that banned mixed marriages. They eventually won a U.S. Supreme Court decision in June 1967 that overturned laws prohibiting interracial unions.

In 1968, Gallup found that only 17% of whites approved of interracial marriage; 56% of blacks approved. Now, 83% of whites and 96% of blacks approve of interracial marriage.

"I contend that as committed couples share in the sanctity, honor and blessing of marriage, the true characteristics of a successful marriage trump any limitations that race may present."

"Interracial Marriages Don’t Work."

That’s quite a statement of which I emphatically disagree.

For the purposes of this discussion, we’ll stick with a simple explanation of the concept of race as being Black, White, Hispanic, Asian or Indian. These constitute the major divisions of race within the United States.

That being said, there are many other variances including culture, geography, ethnic background, social economic strata, nationality and class systems that make claim to the perception of race.

Remarkably, interracial marriage in the United States only became legal after the 1967 Supreme Court decision Loving vs. Virginia. The fact that America went for over 82% or 191 years of its existence with laws prohibiting such marriage may cause some to suggest it validates their claims that these marriages don’t work.

On the contrary, for when you take a closer look at this landmark decision, you find a resounding 9-0 ruling in favor of it! It is rare for such a reversal of the law, and in particular without one opinion of opposition.

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Interracial Marriage Today

Things have certainly changed since that time. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, there are now 24.8 million interracial marriages in the country. In addition, there are 6.8 million children as a result of these unions.

I submit that marriage as a fundamental construct supersedes the limitation of race as its primary force of destruction. So, what does that mean anyway?

Well, simply put, you can’t blame race entirely as the reason that a marriage doesn’t work. Regardless of race, marriage in America, as well as around the world, has a multitude of equal opportunity destroyers.

Every marriage faces challenges from its very inception. When a man and woman come together in marriage, they face a multitude of challenges that may prevent it from working, the least of which is race.

As we explore the intricacy of a successful marriage, the character values that reside on the inside of the heart and mind of the couple become far greater in importance.

For example, how would race (as we describe) have a bearing on the understanding of what is necessary for a lifetime commitment? Would it be rational to say that a Hispanic person understands this but a Black person does not because of the color of their skin? Does one race have a monopoly on the intrinsic values of a faith, hope and love?

Depending on what source you are quoting, the institution of marriage is under increasing scrutiny; mounting pressure and some would even say vicious attack. There is much being said about the significant percentages of marriages that are falling by the wayside.

Given that somewhat sobering reality, would it not be more credible to focus on why, as some would argue, that marriage as a whole is not working regardless of race? A successful marriage of course is the opposite of one that doesn’t work. The same applies to an interracial one.

I contend that as committed couples share in the sanctity, honor and blessing of marriage, the true characteristics of a successful marriage trump any limitations that race may present.

The idea of marriage is an amazing and beautiful vision. At its greatest expression, there is unconditional love and acceptance. It’s a place where honor, courage and commitment live and abide. It is a connection point where two become as one. I submit that this kind of relationship cannot be limited or defeated solely by the color of a persons skin.

I hope you've been inspired to agree with me.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

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