8 Signs It's Time to Kiss a Friendship Goodbye!

Updated on April 29, 2018
letstalkabouteduc profile image

As I grow older, I have less energy for people who drain the very life out of me. That's why I've had to end some friendships.

As I grow older, I become stingier with my time and less willing to waste it on insignificant friendships. While this may sound harsh, it's just part of maturing and turning away from those who deplete you.

When my son got diagnosed with autism, some friends turned their backs on me while others stayed to help. I eventually ended the friendships with those who abandoned me, knowing they were meaningless.
When my son got diagnosed with autism, some friends turned their backs on me while others stayed to help. I eventually ended the friendships with those who abandoned me, knowing they were meaningless. | Source

When I was younger, I embraced people who had lots of drama in their lives, fascinated by how different they were from me. It didn't matter they were often self-centered and self-destructive. But now I choose to surround myself with those who support me when I'm down, get me exited about living, and challenge me to become a better person. With that in mind, I made some tough calls and said goodbye to relationships that didn't serve my needs. Here are 8 signs it's time to end a friendship:

1. She Isn't There for You During Tough Times

The biggest wake-up call for me about friendships came when my son got diagnosed with autism. Up until that point, I would have described myself as a lucky person with a solid group of caring friends. But there's nothing like adversity to put relationships to the test and separate fair-weather friends from the real deal. The saying, "A friend in need is a friend indeed," rings true during trying times.

I had a couple of people in my inner-circle who wouldn't even let me talk about my son. They shut me down so I eventually turned to a therapist to discuss my grief. I should have ended those relationships right then and there, but I let them limp on for many years. I learned an important lesson from that experience: If a person doesn't rise to the occasion when you're in crisis, there's no point to the friendship.

2. She Doesn't Nag You

After my son got diagnosed with autism, I started taking anti-depressants to deal with my grief. One of the medicines caused me to gain over 20 pounds during a six-month period. Fortunately, I had one friend who cared enough to ask me about my sudden weight gain and nagged me to get in shape. We started walking together three mornings a week, and she let me unload about my son. She urged me to stop taking anti-depressants and face head-on the causes of my sadness.

This woman became my prototype of how a friend should behave. She challenged me to become a better, healthier person and I'll be forever grateful. While nagging has a negative connotation, research shows that it's motivational when coming from a caring friend or family member. My friend's nagging meant the world to me because she saw my pain and reached out to help.

After my son got diagnosed with autism, I needed a good friend to nag me about getting off anti-depressants and getting in shape.
After my son got diagnosed with autism, I needed a good friend to nag me about getting off anti-depressants and getting in shape. | Source

3. She Says, “I'm Praying for You” or “You're in My Thoughts” But Never Offers to Help

When you're struggling, words like these ring hollow. When my son got diagnosed with autism, my best friend said them to me constantly. I found them comforting at first but then just irritating. During difficult times, you need a friend who'll spring into action, not just give you lip service.

Some people, who I didn't even consider close friends, took concrete steps to help and I began to see them in a whole different light. They watched my baby when I attended speech and occupational therapy sessions with my son. They brought our family dinner when we had a long day of medical appointments. They invited us to play dates at their homes and picnics in the park. People who did nothing to help quickly became former friends and vanished from our lives.

4. She Doesn't Value Your Time.

It seems we all have a person in our lives like this, someone who always keep us waiting—showing up 20 minutes late for a lunch date or 40 minutes late for a scheduled walk. She always has a ready excuse but basically it comes down to this: She doesn't value your time and she doesn't value you.

Psychiatrist, Dr. Keith Ablow, says some people are chronically tardy to show they're busier and more important. He writes: "People who use lateness to signify they are special or more powerful than those they keep waiting may not plan to show up late, but there’s often a quiet running commentary at the back of their mind suggesting that others will—and really should—wait for them." In the past, I was patient with friends who were late but now show no mercy. While they may not value my time, I certainly do.

5. She Cancels on You.

Although it hurt my feelings, I'd always forgive friends who would cancel on me, thinking we all have unexpected things happen in our lives. I'd just excuse their rude behavior by saying they're flaky. But becoming a mother changed all that and now I drop-kick those folks to the curb. Like those who are perpetually tardy, people who cancel need to feel important and in control.

I stopped putting up with people who cancel when it negatively affected my child. I invited a good friend over to my home for a summer pool party with her three sons. I planned a delicious lunch, got the pool ready, and cleaned the house. An hour before they were due to arrive, she called to cancel, offering up a lame and vague excuse. My 10-year-old was heartbroken. When you screw with me, that's one thing. But when you screw with my kid, that's another. I now have a one-chance rule. If you cancel once, I'll give you another chance. If you cancel again, it's good riddance to you. As my mother used to say when I was a kid, "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me."

If a friend cancels on me, I give them one more chance. If it happens again, I say sayonara. When we're younger, we're more willing to forgive people who cancel on us, saying they're just flaky. As we get older, we're less tolerant.
If a friend cancels on me, I give them one more chance. If it happens again, I say sayonara. When we're younger, we're more willing to forgive people who cancel on us, saying they're just flaky. As we get older, we're less tolerant. | Source

6. She Doesn't Reciprocate

If you think a friendship is a perfectly balanced 50/50 enterprise, you're probably a very lonely person. That's because our lives get messy with health scares, marital problems, work issues, and troubles with our kids. At those times, friends often take low priority.

When my son got diagnosed with autism, I had nothing to offer my friends because I got drained and defeated. They had to shoulder the relationship if they wanted it to continue. Some did and some didn't. But, when the tables got turned, I was there to lift them up and make them feel stronger. There's reciprocation between true friends but not always on a strict tit for tat time-line.

If you're always giving and getting nothing in return, that's probably because the person doesn't really see you as a friend. She's using you to get what she needs and the relationship between the two of you is of no concern. This happened to me when I was a stay-at-mom. Other mothers would often ask me to watch their kids and I happily did so. But they never returned the favor. I quickly realized that they didn't see me as a friend at all, just a babysitter.

7. She Uses You as a Therapist

It's easy to get flattered when a friend turns to us for advice. But often they're using us instead of seeking out the professional help they need. Some people thrive on sharing their problems because it makes them feel like the center of attention.

I had a friend who turned to me with all her marital problems. For many years, I listened to her and gave her the best counsel I could. But, year after year, her problems stayed the same and no progress got made. Then I found out she was talking about these problems with many people, not just me. I was nothing special to her, just another ear. When I recommended that she start seeing a professional, she ended our relationship.

8. She Doesn't Share Your Morals and Values

When you're young, this is hardly a concern as you hang out together, gossip, shop, and attend parties. But, as you grow older, shared values and morals are essential to fostering a friendship, building trust, and having stimulating conversations. Without them, you have only the superficial in common and that's not enough to sustain a meaningful relationship.

I had two best friends in college and I thought we'd become lifetime pals as we established careers, got married, and had kids. But, upon graduation, both of these women had affairs with married men—one with a guy who had a wife and two children and the other to a guy with a pregnant wife. My friends told me about their situations, expecting me to act in a supportive, non-judgmental way. I couldn't do that and that was the end of our friendship. They didn't want me in their lives and I didn't want them in mine.

This Book Helped Me Become a Better Friend

Frientimacy: How to Deepen Friendships for Lifelong Health and Happiness
Frientimacy: How to Deepen Friendships for Lifelong Health and Happiness

Research shows the enormous benefits of having friends. Friends help us have longer and happier lives and make us less susceptible to illness. But making friends and keeping them is often a tricky matter. This books explains how to create meaningful friendships that last a lifetime. I learned so much from reading it and am now committed to making my friendships a priority.

 

Questions & Answers

    © 2017 McKenna Meyers

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      • profile image

        Lauren 

        2 hours ago

        Well this certainly has been interesting Dominic did something again apparently he's stalking me he's talking to my friends trying to get the friendship started again he was listening in on a conversation I was having with my friend and another time when I was on the phone with my boyfriend I guess he doesn't understand what it means to have a friendship end or he might not have let it go so I could use some advice about that too this is all getting so weird McKenna

      • profile image

        Lauren 

        2 days ago

        I'm not his friend again by the way I'm just on good terms with him

      • profile image

        Lauren 

        3 days ago

        I'm going to just be honest with Dominic that I can't support him and I can't because he wasn't there for me when my anxiety was getting worse although it could have been stress because he didn't make time for me the biggest red flag I saw was that he didn't make time for me and he lives on the same street I do that's the part that really bothers me about this whole thing yes it's true the friendship did end two weeks ago he tried to get me to be his friend again but I can't yes I still love him like a younger brother but I can't be friends with him he put his girlfriend first too much

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        4 days ago from Bend, OR

        Thanks for the update, Lauren. This sounds like a complicated relationship with many years of emotion invested in it. While it's difficult, you're learning a lot about yourself by maneuvering through it. What you discover will help you in the future and make you stronger.

        If Dominic wants you to be a supportive friend at this time and you cannot, just be honest with him. He'll have to find support elsewhere until you can fill up your tank. We cannot give what we do not possess.

        When my son was diagnosed with autism, I was thoroughly depleted and had nothing left to give. It took a couple years before I was able to be a good friend again. Fortunately, I had several buddies who stayed with me during this time, accepting that the relationship would be one-sided. I so appreciated their patience and understanding.

        It sounds like you're involved in a triangle with Dominic and his girlfriend. That's always a tricky place to be with lots of conflicting emotions. I'm glad you're able to talk and write about what's happening. That's so good for you. Take care!

      • profile image

        Lauren 

        4 days ago

        Just an update I'm now on good terms with Dominic but he's still not on good terms with me I'm still holding onto a lot of resentment and hurt feelings as I was very close to this guy for a long time fifteen years and I made the mistake of moving the friendship too fast and started texting him it was fun for a while but then I started to see him less and less until finally things started getting uncomfortable he started seeing his girlfriend all the time at one point he didn't even talk to me in person for a whole month because he was in a serious relationship and I'm not sure what he thought was going to happen but needless to say he still wanted me to be his friend but I can't be the supportive friend he's asking for me to be to him

      • profile image

        Lauren 

        12 days ago

        Yes it is hard I've known him for fifteen years so he was actually a close friend but the friendship ended on Sunday because his actions weren't matching his words anymore he said that I was going to go on a run with him and to lunch with him but needless to say neither thing happened I tried to be supportive of his relationship with his girlfriend but I couldn't because he told me he wouldn't let her affect the friendship we had but he lied he said he would always be there for me another lie it's hard for me right now which is why I talk to you so much I need a friend and it sounds like you do too I'm so sorry your friends treated you like that

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        3 weeks ago from Bend, OR

        It sounds like you have a handle on the situation with Dominic, Lauren. Now you're grieving the end of that relationship. That's normal and to be expected but, nonetheless, is hard and painful. Whether we end the friendship or the other person does, it brings about sadness as we mourn what could have been. In our society, we don't often talk about the grief that comes when a friendship ends, but it can be quite profound even when cutting off ties was healthy and necessary.

      • profile image

        Lauren 

        3 weeks ago

        Well McKenna yes and no at the same time he wasn't there for me when I needed him so I don't think it was that healthy for me seeing as I don't really do casual friendships I don't think he respects me very much either because I told him I was upset because he didn't make time to hang out he started talking about his girlfriend but he lives right down the street it would be so easy for him to do that but he still won't and I had to end the friendship a second time because neither of us could be the friend the other wanted us to be I couldn't be the supportive friend he wanted and he couldn't be a close friend so it was simply not working for me anymore

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        4 weeks ago from Bend, OR

        Lauren, I can't give you specific advice regarding your friendship with Dominic. You'll have to decide that one on your own. Just don't get bogged down by the details but keep focusing on the big picture: Is this a healthy, reciprocal friendship based on kindness, love, and respect? What's my intention for keeping or ending this friendship?

        Perhaps, he can remain a friend but not a close one. There's definitely different levels of friendships. Some are intimate. We can tell those friends anything, and they're there for us during difficult times. Other friendships are casual and, yes, a little superficial but still bring us joy. We hurt ourselves when we can't distinguish the intimate from the superficial ones.

        Perhaps, you have lessons to learn from this relationship with Dominic. Why is it affecting you so? If you can answer that, I think you'll have some peace.

      • profile image

        Lauren 

        5 weeks ago

        I have to say that the article is really good I keep reading it over and over again because it teaches me something new every time I do last night Dominic texted me trying to get me to be his friend again I need some advice about that as well because he just won't give up it got so bad that I had to block his number he's still doing the same thing by the way

      • profile image

        Lauren 

        5 weeks ago

        McKenna I'm really glad we have been talking daily you seem like a very nice girl and well Dominic did show kindness when my dad died five years ago he sure wasn't showing much kindness when I was having anxiety and feeling sick like I was going to throw up that's how upset I was at that moment and the guy still left town plus his hanging out with his girlfriend all the time wasn't helping me to think well of him and I don't think he should have been giving her priority but he did at first when I ended the friendship he kinda was fighting it tooth and nail thinking that he was doing the right thing but the emotional pain is what forced me to end the friendship it made me kind of hard hearted but I feel much better now and have much more respect for my mom now and I can even have a decent conversation and yes I still miss some parts of Dominic but not the person he is today sure he was sweet for a while but I guess not anymore I'm glad I found this article though it helped me to end the toxic friendship and now I feel better sure I'm sneezing but no more emotional pain

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        5 weeks ago from Bend, OR

        Lauren, thanks for the update. Because of your father's death, you're probably more mature and in need of deeper, more meaningful relationships than most people your age. I felt that way when my dad died--like an old soul surrounded by peers with problems that seemed superficial to me. When I found someone with depth, though, we clicked and formed a strong, lasting bond. I learned over the years, through all the ups and downs, that I can count my true friends on just one hand, and I feel blessed to have that many.

        In our culture today, we're inundated by phony friendships—people on social media who constantly post their vacation photos, dining experiences, and fun adventures but never have time to connect with us one-on-one. It's not a coincidence that our society is simultaneously dealing with high rates of depression, anxiety, drug abuse, suicide, and isolation. We humans need real relationships where we can be honest, open, and vulnerable. They're essential for our emotional well-being.

        I wish you a lifetime of meaningful relationships, Lauren. You have a lot to offer.

      • profile image

        Lauren 

        5 weeks ago

        McKenna it seems like you are a true friend you have me the best advice and I finally cut him off I just knew it was what needed to happen you told me so yourself I just want to say thank you for giving me the greatest advice ever yes there's some anxiety but it will bet better I bet he must feel foolish because the thing that pushed me over the edge was this guy was spending all his free time with his girlfriend I just texted him telling him that it was over and I was done I know it might sound rude to have ended the friendship with him through text messages but I wasn't home I was at the phone store with my mom at that time and I'm trying to not go back to being his friend ever until he changes if he ever changes but I don't think he will and I'm sure it's what I want

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        6 weeks ago from Bend, OR

        First, Lauren, let me say how sorry I am about your father. Losing a parent is a life-altering experience and it's too bad your friend didn't show the kindness and compassion you needed at that time. Yes, it's very ironic (and sad) since he's becoming a doctor—a profession where those two qualities are crucial. You could create excuses for him (he's super busy with his studies, he doesn't know what it's like to lose someone close), but that would be a big mistake. His behavior spoke volumes and it's wise to listen. Maya Angelou said it best, “When someone shows you who they are, believe them.”

        It's these experiences that tell us who's worth keeping in our lives, who should be placed on the periphery, and who should be eliminated. When we're young, we have lots of experiences like this and that's normal, healthy, and good. However, what's not normal, healthy, and good is when we don't learn from them.

        Whether it's friendships or romantic relationships, we have to become discerning, finding out what's acceptable to us and what's not. At this point in my life, it's critical that I have friends who push me to be a better person, to eat right and exercise, to read and learn, and do positive things for the community. I just don't have time for the perpetually negative folks who bring me down and drain me of my energy. Without some really bad relationships, though, I wouldn't have gotten to this point!

      • profile image

        Lauren 

        6 weeks ago

        Wow it seems like you've had a hard time every friend you cut off seems worth it though you did the right thing I'm thinking I should be more like you and become less tolerant of all the things you mentioned as I'm going through a similar situation I've got anxiety really bad after my dad died five years ago and my one friend went out of town when I needed him because I was upset you really are a good example for younger people like myself the worse part of it is he's going to be a doctor and didn't even care that I was having anxiety wouldn't answer my texts at all I've tried dropping subtle hints that said I couldn't do it anymore but he just ignored it and changed the subject

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        4 months ago from Bend, OR

        Dyme, I'm sorry you're going through this difficult time. Friendships are so valuable in our lives so it's understandable we feel hurt when they come to an end. We need to grieve the loss, and it takes time. The fact that it's so painful reveals how much the friendship meant to us.

        Sometimes we can step back and see we've outgrown the relationship--that we've moved forward in our life journey and the other person hasn't. It's my goal to always be changing--getting wiser, stronger, and more compassionate. Other people are okay staying in the same safe place and, therefore, there's a disconnect.

        Take good care of yourself, Dyme. I'm glad you're seeing and appreciating the supportive friends around you who challenge you to be your best. I never looked for that when I was younger, but now it's everything to me.

      • profile image

        Dyme 

        4 months ago

        I have recently had to face this with a couple pf significant relationships in my life. One wasn't as hard because it pretty clear it was more of an overbearing imbalance that i identified. Now the other I am still struggling with as it is. I have been seeing a therapist and she hit on all the points you touched. A friend of almost 30 years slowly crumbling. Used to be my person. We shared everything, all our highs and lows, is my only child's godmother. In recent years i suppose life needs, shortcomings have brought to life parallel values and increasingly shes not adding anything to where Im at in life. This has been an almost 2 yr struggle. Every conversation tendes to end going south, till it became exhausting. Now we barely talk. I jiat know in my heart it will not be the same again. A lot has happened and passive aggressively at that as I've increasingly realized shes a narcissist like a few of the other people i had to remove from my life. Its just unfortunate when friends become strangers. All u mentioned is so true. Theres a couple of people now I have identified as havkng truly always been consistent and made me feel good about myself, always challenging me to be better etc. Those i realize are the actual types of friendships that bring meaning to me now. Its painful and hard though.

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        4 months ago from Bend, OR

        Tammy, I feel your pain because I, too, have had conflicts with neighbors and know it's not fun. Like you, I try to get along with everyone, but sometimes that's part of the problem. Someone sees that as a weakness and tries to take control.

        I would give your neighbor some time and space to cool down. Stop beating yourself up and stay busy with activities and friends. It sounds like the girls next door are bored if they're listening to adult conversations and then reporting back to Mom. I'd just ignore them. Your neighbor will probably come around in due time but, if not, it doesn't seem like much of a loss. Good luck!

      • profile image

        TammyR1313 

        5 months ago

        I fill I had a toxic friendship with nextdoor neighbor, and she made me feel like I was the guilty one... Here is what happened.

        I know it is for the best to let go but the last two days i have really beaten myself up for something i didnt do...

        The other day I was talking to a neighbor behind us, she was talking about how cruel it was for the ones right beside me to keep a goat pinned up in such a small pen.I told her that they let the goat out in th back yard, She was talking about how horrible that the goat had mange and her husband told the daughter(The mom kept sending the girls out to listen to all what we said) . She asked the daughter if she wanted to sell the goat, any ways the daughter only heard mayb 1/4 of the conversation and went to tell her mom that we both was talking about the girls. I simply answered the ladys question about the goat and my neighbor thinks I was actually talking about the girls.

        I am too old for these games but now my next door neighbor is not talking to me, threw stuff in my yard I gave her. The lady behind us tried to tell her she was only asking about the goat but the mom of course believed all the young girl said. Which is normal for a moms side But i really feel that she should of asked us and herself should of came out to actually ask what it was all about.. I did nothing wrong but she is making me feel I did... I tried to talk to her but she told me to leave she did not want to talk... I would like to get this settled since we are nextdoor neighbors but it seems hopeless...I try to get along with everyone, Im in my late 40's and her in her 30s and Im too old for childish games, I should of seen this coming when she did not talk to me for 3 months because I did not give her my new number, but I pay the bill where does it say by law I had to give her my number.. I would just like to be peaceful, go on, stop feeling guilty and walk around my back yard talking to my Husband and son with out her sending her daughters out to spy and find out what we are saying.. her daughter that started all of this is a sheltered 14 year old and a 10 year old... The mom takes off alot and leaves them two girls at home with the 2 year old... Any suggestions how i can take care of this matter or should i just ignore it and not feel like a prisoner in my own home and afraid there daughters will run back in and tell more lies?

        Is it normal to feel guilty for what I did not do? and I should not have to walk on pins and needles in my own yard just because she sends her kids to fence to listen to all my husband and I say or my son and I say... Yes we both own our houses... she wants me to move but I will not, this is OUR HOME NOT HERS...

      • Glenn Stok profile image

        Glenn Stok 

        6 months ago from Long Island, NY

        “Robbing my energy” - That’s exactly the reason I finally decided to end it. And, yes, it did take a lot of thought beforehand. It was a tough decision, but a worthwhile one.

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        6 months ago from Bend, OR

        That's so true, Glenn We also have less patience for people who rob us of our energy. I'm really picky about who I let into my sphere now. I want positive, upbeat people who challenge me to be a better person. I think when I was younger I accepted a lot of troubled people into my life because they made me feel superior. But I can't take the drama now. While it's hard to end a long-time friendship, I'm sure you gave it a lot of thought and made the right decision.

      • Glenn Stok profile image

        Glenn Stok 

        6 months ago from Long Island, NY

        A few years ago I discontinued a friendship with someone I knew since we were kids. Your explanation of reasons to end a friendship rang true for me as I related many of your examples to the reasons I felt I needed to end that friendship.

        As you said, when we get older we tend to value our time a lot more, and therefore we have less tolerance for toxic friendships.

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        8 months ago from Bend, OR

        Yes, Lauren, a friend who truly listens is rare and should not be taken for granted. I read recently about "compassionate listening" and have been applying it both personally and professionally. In compassionate listening, you don't give advice, make comments, or pass judgment. You let the speaker purge their hurt. I find it to be so very powerful, and it sounds like what your friend did for you.

      • profile image

        Lauren 

        8 months ago

        This has opened my eyes and showed me that a guy who I didn't really think is a friend really is a friend he was there for me when my dad passed away and now he listens to me when I talk to him even if what I say makes him uncomfortable believe me friendship isn't always comfortable he did help me through my anxiety

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        8 months ago from Bend, OR

        Please accept my condolences on the death of your mother, LaTrice. Sometimes a major event in our lives (your mother's passing, my son's autism diagnosis) gives us great clarity. We realize life is precious, and we don't want to waste time with those who bring us down. During those difficult times, we have less energy and we can't waste it on negative people. Good luck to you. I'm glad it's given you the incentive to make new friends.

      • Miss Liberty31 profile image

        LaTrice 

        8 months ago from Las Vegas, NV

        I'm thrilled that I stumbled upon this article, so reading it has been informative and refreshing. Unfortunately, not too many people know how to be a true friend in someone's time of need. Life's too short to deal with unnecessary drama, especially when it's coming from a person who's only available on a part-time basis.

        I recently ended a "friendship," and haven't regretted my decision. I haven't seen and heard from my so-called friend in a couple of months. He texted me out of the blue while I was at work. I was barely responding back to his text messages and phone calls, since I was busy doing my job. All of a sudden, he gets angry by accusing me of being insecure, wasting his time, poking fun at my appearance and being arrogant. I found his accusations comical, because he's insecure and has a problem. It's not my fault that he can't find anyone to go out with. Despite being a single woman, I wouldn't date someone like him, due to his foul attitude and walking around with a chip on his shoulder. I told him to lose my phone number and blocked it.

        I don't need someone like him in my life, since I have enough going on as it is. My mom passed away four months ago, and I'm still grieving her death.

        He gave me the opportunity to make new friends. Good riddance!

      • lambservant profile image

        Lori Colbo 

        15 months ago from Pacific Northwest

        I love the saying that says To have a friend you must be a friend. I see you live in Bend, my granddaughter was there until recently. I love it there. Must be hot.

      • letstalkabouteduc profile imageAUTHOR

        McKenna Meyers 

        15 months ago from Bend, OR

        Thanks so much for the compliment, Lori. You made my day. I think it's ridiculous how people define friendship today ("I have 550 friends on Facebook"). I think, if we're really lucky, we have a hand-full of really good and loyal friends. They're the ones who deserve our focus, kindness, and appreciation. The older I get the more I value them.

      • lambservant profile image

        Lori Colbo 

        15 months ago from Pacific Northwest

        I find it odd there are no comments. This was a great article and I learned a lot from it. Thank you for sharing your experiences and thoughts on friendship.

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