How to Hide Your Emotions – Don't Let Others Know What You're Thinking

Updated on January 9, 2017

Why hide emotions? Well the answer is quite simple. There are situations when emotions and thoughts are best kept hidden than displayed in front of people who may ridicule, mock, make fun of or even take advantage of your feelings. As usual, let's stay away from cliché words of advice like controlling temper, laughing it out and staying calm. This article pin points the very acts and precise things you can do to hide and control your emotions. Don't let anyone know what you are thinking about.

A face like this is an instant giveaway of emotions and feelings. These facial expressions are everything that you mustn't do if you want to hide your emotions. To find out about what you should, read on!
A face like this is an instant giveaway of emotions and feelings. These facial expressions are everything that you mustn't do if you want to hide your emotions. To find out about what you should, read on! | Source

1) Take a deep breath

We've talked about the benefit of taking a deep breath while trying to be calm in an earlier post. The same logic applies here too. Besides the obvious benefit of amplifying the supply of oxygen, a deep breath will allow you to recollect your composure and be cool.

2) Stop moving your eyebrows

Whether you like it or not, your eyes are the first escape route for your emotions. Your eyes may not be verbal, but they say a lot and that's exactly where your eyebrows come in. Angry, sad, excited and nervous situations have a certain eyebrow movement and position attached to them. If you want to hide what you are feeling and thinking, stop moving your eyebrows and ease the tension from your forehead.

3) Don't put up a fake smile

A smile is a great asset to carry, but not always. While a smiling and bubbly look on your face may win you hearts and affection, that may not be the best thing to have in a serious meeting. You may think that with a fake smile you may be able to hide your feelings like sadness or anger. But we all know that a fake is, more often than not, easy to spot. So if you really want to hide your emotions, keep your lips straight.

4) Relax your face

There's a lot more to your facial expressions than just your eyes and lips. Relax your face and stay away from grinding teeth, frowning or displaying other typical emotion bound expressions. No this is not about carrying around a steel face and acting like a tough guy, however, just a simple tip on keeping a straight face when you need it the most.

5) Don’t support your head

A droopy head held by the fist of your hand or a sulky face buried into your palms can be giveaways of a gloomy mood, depression or sadness. The phrase, hold you head up high, is never better implemented than in a situation when you are trying to hide your feelings. Keep your neck straight.

6) Stop fidgeting and refrain from constantly adjusting yourself

Sudden body movements and constant signs of discomfort are clear signs of nervousness or anxiety. Ease yourself and be comfortable. Emotions and feelings get hard to decipher if you maintain a calm and relaxed body language.

7) Pause, think and speak in a balanced tone

The tone of your voice can strip you bare of your thoughts. Frequent changes in the tone, speaking too fast, stuttering and stammering can give out signals to the person listening to you about what is going on in your mind. Don't let that happen, and speak properly. A slow pace of speaking also gives your mind those critical few microseconds more to think before you utter your next sentence.

8) Disassociate yourself from the situation

While detaching yourself from the situation is anything but easy, it can be a necessity if you want to hide your emotions from onlookers. While it is not rocket science, it is also very difficult. The easiest way to go about is to think of happy thoughts or good memories. Think of a warm moment spent with a loved one or a moment of ecstasy. That will help you to mentally take yourself away from the frenzy and anxiety of your current situation.

9) Speak to yourself in your mind

"Calm down, you can do this. Just stay cool" may have been a line that even the most famous sportspersons and celebrities must have said to themselves during nerve wracking moments. You should do that too! If you think that you are letting your emotions get the better of you, simply tell you mind and ask it to think the way you want it to. All you need to do, is ask!

Questions & Answers

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      • profile image

        Anger Management 

        4 weeks ago

        Thanks for this. I have serious anger management issues and so far, it's helped pretty well! A few weeks ago I had found out that someone that I had trusted had been spreading rumors about my friend and I blew up and started saying some disturbing things. I can only remember up until My friend was starting to take me to the wellbeing teacher but that's what my friends had told me.

      • profile image

        123 

        6 months ago

        This is, honestly, what I needed. It's like I've been bottling up all of my emotions for so long that, I'm just now blowing up. I thought that my way was effective, to be fair I've probably been doing this for 5 years. And now that I exploded, people are offering me help, but I shouldn't need help, I didn't before, why now? Anyway, thanks for the article, I'm sure I speak for every one when I say, we all really needed that

      • profile image

        KittyKat666 

        6 months ago

        I like it I might even try it

      • profile image

        Rakesh sawane 

        8 months ago

        Nice

      • profile image

        not so sure 

        14 months ago

        sometimes it is easier said then done

      • profile image

        Steph 

        17 months ago

        Hay thank u for the advice it really helped me and hope it helps others in the same way x

      • passionatelearnr profile image

        passionatelearnr 

        23 months ago

        Useful advice and interesting read.

      • Sue Bailey profile image

        Susan Bailey 

        5 years ago from South Yorkshire, UK

        Voted up, useful and shared. I find it so hard to hide my emotions

      • starlightreflex profile image

        Doug DeWalt 

        5 years ago from Ohio USA

        Projecting body language is very effective, just the way you stand can change the course of a conversation.

      • sparkleyfinger profile image

        Lynsey Harte 

        5 years ago from Glasgow

        Voted up, useful and interesting. I have always hid my emotions well, and have been called heartless at times, but I would rather deal with things in my own time, rather than in public. Great hub!

      • savvydating profile image

        Yves 

        5 years ago

        This is actually very practical advice. All your suggestion can work quite well in so many professional settings. The only thing I would add is that sometimes we can get so used to doing this, that we may come across as too aloof. My emotional pendulum has swung the other way now, and I'm more like my true, more emotional self.... but this hub is a good reminder for me of how important it is to match the face with the situation, and to try to maintain some balance. Voting up.

      • RTalloni profile image

        RTalloni 

        5 years ago from the short journey

        These are good tips to think through for those times that it is important not to express feelings when interacting with other people.

      • aprilness profile image

        April Olshavsky 

        5 years ago from Somewhere between California and nowhere

        Thank you for this! I thought I was the queen of dissociation, but now I am rethinking that. People are always asking me what's wrong, when really, I just prefer to sort things out myself before I burden someone else with my emotional baggage. I'm going to try a few of these tips. :-)

      • Grace-Wolf-30 profile image

        Grace-Wolf-30 

        5 years ago from England

        I understand why you have written this hub, but there are ways of expressing yourself without hurting other people. I agree that there are some people who you would not want to know how you are feeling, for example, somebody who wishes you harm, however, in day to day scenario's, if you don't express yourself your feelings get pent up and they can come out at a later date in the wrong way. I really like the tips you have given, and they are very relevant methods of calming down, but I think it is also important to return to a situation and speak your mind honestly and openly, and allow those who you are talking to speak their minds too. In this circumstance, you can use unconditional positive regard. This is listening to someone elses point of view without judging them. When you use unconditional positive regard, the people you are dealing with will feel more relaxed with you and will unconsciously use the same method with you. Open communication is nearly always the best way forward in resolving conflict and stress. When you communicate openly, but without high emotions, everyone knows where they stand with each other, and from this point you can plan positively for the future. Thank you for your hub, it is a useful read.

      • MDavisatTIERS profile image

        Marilyn L Davis 

        5 years ago from Georgia

        You are correct about the eyebrows. I opened and ran a women's recovery home and when doing groups, had to make sure that my facial expressions stayed neutral while someone was sharing, but the eyebrows seemed to have a will of their own; let me bangs grow to "hide them".

      • viveresperando profile image

        viveresperando 

        6 years ago from A Place Where Nothing Is Real

        As a person who has always been told I show my emotions on my sleeves..... lol. Found this very inciteful, thanks for the share.

      • meloncauli profile image

        meloncauli 

        6 years ago from UK

        Interesting hub. Thanks for sharing.

      • Dahlia Flower profile image

        Dahlia Flower 

        6 years ago from Canada

        This is a good topic. There are situations in most of our lives that come up where we need to look composed. In situations such as poor or rude service, for instance, when we make the effort to compose ourselves into a peaceful space, we soon feel what we are trying to portray. Thanks for the good tips.

      • Neil Sperling profile image

        Neil Sperling 

        6 years ago from Port Dover Ontario Canada

        Great points. Self control is a skill anyone can develop - you laid out a nice ground work here. Great Job.

      • Tonipet profile image

        Tonette Fornillos 

        6 years ago from The City of Generals

        Thank you for this princess. I think keeping a straight face when you need it the most is most challenging. It would end me up talking to myself "I'm FUNNY!!" :-) Loved this hub. Interesting and voted up!

        Tonipet

      • Robwrite profile image

        Rob 

        6 years ago from Oviedo, FL

        Hi Princess; I'm an expert in this. These are good suggestions.

        Rob

      • FloraBreenRobison profile image

        FloraBreenRobison 

        6 years ago

        These are important things to remember. Thanks for these.

      • PhetsyDutchko profile image

        PhetsyDutchko 

        6 years ago from West Point, CA & Shelby, NC

        This would be a good article to give to college grads just starting in the professional workspace.

      • thesingernurse profile image

        Tina Siuagan 

        6 years ago from Rizal, Philippines

        Thank you for sharing this. When I want to hide my emotions, I kind of talk to myself on doing it. It's like making the inner 'you' to cooperate and the rest follows. Then I can hide what my true emotion is, on a certain situation, and people will never find out... even until now. Hahaha!

        Beautiful hub. :D

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